New Project, New Plant

It’s December 1, first day of the last month of fall!

Many folks think there’s little to do for the garden in fall and winter but it’s just not the case. True, you can’t see as much as on a typical summer stroll—there’s very little growing, few insects, fewer leaves. At least, that’s the scene here in Virginia. It was nearly 70º today and while I wasn’t out in the dirt, I was getting my hands dirty with a fall project, about which I’ll write in more detail in another post.

What I’m really excited about today is more info on a plant that’s new to me, the Wax Myrtle. Based on some preliminary research, it may be a VERY good fit for our back yard as it solves a lot of problems. The Genus is Myrica and there’s a range of species falling under the common name Wax Myrtle, or, yet even more common, Bayberry.

Characteristics and features of this plant that have me excited:

Bayberry hedge sitting inside a very handsome stone bed. This is a Pacific variety. Gorgeous.
Bayberry hedge sitting inside a very handsome stone bed. This is a Pacific variety. Gorgeous.
  • Fast growing
  • Evergreen
  • Max height 20′
  • Smells nice
  • Provides wildlife hideout
  • Can be used to make candles, insect repellant, and privacy screen
  • May tolerate juglone
  • May fix nitrogen!

I’d previously been looking at bamboo for our back yard border, but Wax Myrtle may be an even better solution, especially given that insect repellent part; mosquitos seem to be getting worse here every year!

I’ve got a question in to the sales team at TyTy. I’ll keep you posted.

Gardening is Good,
~Ben

 

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